The Japanese "Maddie"?

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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Freedom on Fri 03 Jun 2016, 6:48 pm

I used to watch extracts of the Japanese game show Endurance on the Clive James programme.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4mRklA6KRmo

It was absolutely bonkers!

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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Mo on Fri 03 Jun 2016, 6:54 pm

I used to love the Clive James shows he had such a dry sense of humour!

Although it was mentioned on the news about the forest having brown bears, you would have thought all those people searching would have encountered one of them.

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Re:The Japanese Maddie?

Post  costello on Fri 03 Jun 2016, 8:08 pm

Mo wrote:You know what the Japanese are like for their endurance tests - you never know they could have been putting him through his paces!

That could well be the answer Mo. Discipline etc, although a bit extreme unless they knew their boy knew the area.
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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Freedom on Fri 03 Jun 2016, 10:11 pm

A bizarre oddity - if you read Costello's post when not logged in, the words "bit extreme" can be clicked on and this is what you get.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NK4I0K0?tag=viglink20254-20

There you go, now you know where you can get a Naileater Auger Bit Extreme.

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Re:The Japanese Maddie?

Post  costello on Fri 03 Jun 2016, 10:21 pm

I wondered why the words 'bit extreme' were highlighted in dare I say 'blue' in my last post. Bizarre indeed. I noticed this when I logged off from my laptop which is downstairs.
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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Freedom on Tue 07 Jun 2016, 9:28 am

A report from yesterday.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jun/06/parents-of-japanese-boy-left-in-forest-face-possible-abuse-charge

The last sentence jumps out at me!

There is still no satisfactory explanation for why Yamato was not discovered when soldiers on a regular patrol checked the hut last Monday morning but found nothing out of the ordinary.

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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  seahorse on Tue 07 Jun 2016, 11:27 am

Would he have stayed in the army hut for a week without exploring the wider area? The nearest row of houses was only about 0.38 miles away (over the road) and there was a golf course right next to it as well.

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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Andrew on Tue 07 Jun 2016, 11:51 am

I still think this story is a bit fishy myself.

A whiff of 'sea-bass' about it.

Imo.
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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Freedom on Tue 07 Jun 2016, 11:53 am

I suppose that he could have been too frightened to seek help at the houses or the golf course but I haven't changed my mind over my original thoughts that there is more to this case than at first seemed.

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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Andrew on Sat 11 Jun 2016, 7:57 am

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/9e4c75b4-2dcb-11e6-a18d-a96ab29e3c95.html

‘When did we become a world that forgets that people make mistakes?’
©Lucas Varela

There are many times the spawn have tested the extremes of my patience but, thus far, I have never felt the need to abandon them in a forest full of bears. I did once walk away from the boy when he refused to leave a toyshop in Bristol but hovered, hidden from view, in case he made a break for it; and, anyway, the ursine threat in the West Country is statistically lower than in rural Japan.
Even so, I doubt there are many parents who, while not condoning what happened, did not at some point empathise with the father of seven-year-old Yamato Tanooka, after his disastrous overreaction to his son’s bad behaviour. Mr Tanooka’s plan to teach the boy a lesson by driving off without him backfired when he returned a few minutes later to find the boy had run away, sparking a week-long search.


Now his parents face calls for their prosecution, though I doubt any punishment could match the seven days of soul-shredding guilt they endured before he was found alive and well. I further doubt that much penalty is needed by way of a deterrent, though perhaps there are hundreds of exasperated parents who would otherwise see abandonment among bears as a new tool for quietening fractious offspring.

I received a salutary, though less terrifying, lesson in the dangers of ill-considered punishment many years ago when I was forced to cancel a trip to Legoland — for which I had taken time off work — after a casual threat to do so failed to have its desired effect. I cannot even remember what provoked my ire. All I can recall is the sullen day we spent at home, after I realised that failure to carry through on my ludicrously disproportionate threat would destroy my credibility when future discipline was needed. On the upside, we all gained valuable insights. The spawn learnt not to call my bluff, and I learnt not to make threats I did not wish to carry out towards children with no real concept of consequences. Had I threatened to leave them to the bears, I would have faced a serious dilemma. I like to think I’d have done the right thing, but once you lose that credibility . . .

At about the same time as little Yamato was not being eaten by bears, the parents of Isaiah Dickerson were being excoriated after he clambered into the gorilla enclosure at Cincinnati Zoo, forcing staff to shoot a silverback that got hold of him.

In both cases, the parents were at fault — but I am sure that part of the immense joy I felt on hearing that Yamato was safe came from being able to relate to a parent suddenly facing a life of the most bitter regret for an all-too-recognisable mistake. It is not that I can see myself abandoning my child in the woods — I cannot. But I can imagine the brief lapse of judgment or fleeting distraction that led to both errors.

I recall a dread-filled few minutes one morning while walking the girl to school, when she insisted on a race in which she would take a 200-yard short cut through an adjacent cemetery. When she did not emerge at the other end, I felt my innards rising in panic until a fellow parent told me she had gone on ahead into school. It didn’t feel negligent initially but, as the fear rose, I thought of those dozens of parents “who only took their eyes off their child for an instant”.

I doubt there is a parent alive who cannot offer a similar story to my minutes of fear. Except, apparently, there is. For society, and especially the web, is seemingly full of perfect parents who would never make such mistakes. It is similarly filled with people who criticise, in the most heartless terms, the parents of Madeleine McCann, as if doing so somehow confirms the accuser’s moral or parental superiority.

When did we become a world that forgets that people make mistakes? Sometimes these mistakes have catastrophic consequences. That does not stop them being ones we might all make.

As for the zoo incident, show me a parent who has never let their attention stray from their child and I will show you a kid at least as screwed up as the one who survived the gorilla enclosure.

robert.shrimsley@ft.com; Twitter: @robertshrimsley
Illustration by Lucas Varela
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Re: The Japanese "Maddie"?

Post  Freedom on Sat 11 Jun 2016, 9:24 am

I agree with this entirely in cases where there is no doubt that there is nothing else to a story than parents have made a mistake.

I posted links recently to two such cases where two children wandered off and drowned due to their parents' lack of attention and another was abducted (yes, really) from a caravan where she had been left alone.

The writer of this article has in my opinion failed to distinguish between cases like that and others where it is obvious that the parents have much to hide.

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